Elysium Basis Review: Everything to Know About This Supplement

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Basis, a supplement sold by a health company called Elysium, is billed as “the one daily supplement your cells need.” The company touts this supplement as being the end product of over 25 years of aging research backed by six Nobel Prize-winning scientific advisors, although these scientists had little to do with the actual research process for this product.

The supplement was created to support cellular health as the body ages, but the company and the pill both face criticism for not offering benefits as advertised.

While many have purchased the Basis supplement from Elysium, others have been openly skeptical about the effects of the pills. This review offers an objective analysis of Elysium Basis to help you make an informed decision about potentially purchasing the product.

What is the Elysium Basis Supplement?

Basis is a once-daily supplement that claims to support health at the cellular level. According to marketing materials, the pill has undergone decades of research and is backed by science. Basis is said to work by increasing levels of a coenzyme called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, or NAD.

NAD helps the biological process in the body, but it decreases with age. The company does not explicitly say Basis can help defy aging, but others have made claims regarding the pill’s abilities to provide anti-aging benefits and help users feel young.

Basis is “created for long-term use in adults of all ages.” The dosage is two pills each morning, with each bottle containing a 30-day supply (60 pills total). The capsules themselves are vegan, nut-free, gluten-free, and free from artificial colors and flavors. The ingredients are all FDA approved, but there are two main ingredients in Basis supplement that can provide potential health benefits.

One is pterostilbene, which is plant-based and can protect eth body against stress. The other ingredient is nicotinamide, which is a “direct precursor” to NAD and helps power the body’s metabolic system.

Nicotinamide Riboside

The primary ingredient in the Basis supplement is nicotinamide riboside. This compound is not patented by Elysium and can be found in a variety of other supplements similar to Basis. The marketing materials for Basis seem to suggest the company developed a proprietary blend for the supplement, but in actuality, they purchased ingredients including nicotinamide riboside from a popular company called ChromaDex until 2017.

A lawsuit occurred (which we’ll discuss in a few minutes) causing Elysium to manufacture its own nicotinamide riboside (NR, for short).

NR has shown positive effects in studies on animals. It has extended the lifespan of mice and worms, opposed type 2 diabetes in mice, and improved overall cell health. Elysium ran a human clinical study that included 120 adults ranging in age from 60 to 80. The study found consumption of NR through Basis supplementation increased NAD levels by an average of 40% in four weeks and maintained the NAD increase for another four weeks for a total of 60 days with raised NAD.

No longitudinal research has been done on NR in humans, so it is difficult to know the exact effects supplementation may have on slowing the aging process.

Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD)

NAD is a coenzyme found in all living cells. It was first discovered in 1906 and performs two main roles in the body: turning nutrients into energy and carrying out biological processes. NAD works with other proteins to repair damaged DNA, maintain proper cell functions, and regulating the internal body clock. NAD declines with age, so the logic behind Basis is simple. More NAD leads to better health, even as we get older.

Does Elysium Basis Really Work?

Maybe. The components of Basis have shown health improvements in lab mice, but not enough research has been done on humans to prove the merit of supplementation. The company boasts several positive reviews and testimonials, but many question whether Basis is worth it. There is nothing to suggest Basis is better or more effective than other NR supplements on the market, however, Elysium does engage in several clever marketing tactics.

The company often reiterates that it is based in science and is highly devoted to research. They even boast a 35-member scientific advisory board filled with Nobel Prize winners and other highly regarded individuals. However, the role of this advisory board seems to be limited to lending credibility to Elysium instead of researching products.

In fact, one of the board members claims the advisory board “does NOT endorse the products of Elysium.” Instead, these respected individuals “are part of a marketing scheme where their names and reputations are being used” to support products.

Further, branding Basis as a supplement allows Elysium to avoid strict regulations from the FDA. Supplements have few restrictions and regulations and can be sold provided they do not make specific claims related to health. You may notice Elysium makes vague claims about the Basis product—this is to sell the supplement without needing to first prove its effectiveness in humans.

The sleek design and reputable sources backing Basis suggest the product works. Science in non-human animals advocate the ingredients in Basis can be effective components in anti-aging and cellular health. Preliminary science in humans backs up these claims. However, there is not yet enough research to definitively prove that Elysium Basis works.

Is Elysium Basis Safe to Use?

There is no evidence to suggest Basis is unsafe for human consumption, and the company does claim the supplement was created for long-term use. The main ingredients in the supplement are also naturally occurring in food products such as milk and red wine.

Both are meant to increase the amount of NAD, a compound which already occurs naturally in living cells. The study conducted on Basis found supplementation lead to no negative side effects in kidney function and liver enzymes.

This suggests that, when used as directed, Basis supplementation is perfectly okay in otherwise healthy adults. However, the study was conducted by Elysium itself, and no extended research has been conducted for long periods of time. For these reasons, some are still skeptical of Elysium Basis and other supplements that market anti-aging benefits.

There are a few people who should avoid taking Elysium Basis. The product is not intended for children, and their NAD levels are already quite high. As such, it is not an ideal product for pregnant women or those who are breastfeeding. Basis should not be taken in the two weeks leading up to surgery. A doctor should be consulted before supplementing with Basis if you take any other medications.

Elysium Health: Complaints and Lawsuits

Elysium Basis Review

Elysium Health, the company that produces and sells the Basis supplement, is not universally loved. There are a few things about the company that leaves consumers dissatisfied. Some dislike the fact that you can only order Basis online for the company directly (although others appreciate the convenience of monthly deliveries).

One reviewer found it strange that Elysium would not disclose the location of the business’ home office or factory locations. Many discredit the Basis product as a hoax or a scam since the company’s product is not supported by research in human subjects and the proposed benefits of taking the pills have not been proven.

Elysium Health faces a lot of consumer criticism, but no complaint is worse than that of its former supplier, ChromaDex. In fact, ChromaDex sued Elysium Health for “punitive damages, money damages, and interest,” after Elysium failed to pay for supplies. The lawsuit amount was undisclosed.

ChromaDex

ChromaDex is the proprietary supplier of the nicotinamide riboside used in Basis and other NR supplements, as ChromaDex owns a patent on the ingredient sold under the trademark NIAGEN. Elysium reportedly ordered NIAGEN products through ChromaDex early in 2014 but failed to pay for them in June of that year.

According to ChromaDex, Elysium “made false promises and representations to induce ChromaDex into providing large supplies” of the ingredients needed to produce the Basis supplement.

Even after the lawsuit, Elysium attempted to purchase ChromaDex products at half of the originally agreed upon price. ChromaDex refused, and Elysium wound up paying full price for their products. Shortly after, Elysium hired the Vice President of Business Development for ChromaDex, Mark Morris.

Morris became the head of scientific technology for Elysium. Elysium then stopped its relationship with ChromaDex and stopped ordering supplies from the manufacturer.

The lawsuit states ChromaDex reached out to Elysium regarding the non-payment issues, but Elysium did not respond. They also refused to comment on the lawsuit to third parties. This is a bit strange, but the truly frightening effects of the lawsuit are yet to be seen.

Since NIAGEN is patented by ChromaDex and used as a key ingredient in the Basis supplement, it is unclear what Elysium will do when their NR supply is depleted. A spokesperson for the company claims “our customers can have 100% confidence in our ability to supply then with Basis now and in the future.”

It is possible Basis will use different ingredients in the future (which negates any research done on the product) or that Elysium will attempt to manufacture its own NP (which will need to be thoroughly tested for quality and effectiveness). Either way, the broken relationship with ChromaDex will likely hurt Elysium Health.

An Objective Elysium Basis Review

Elysium Basis has a lot of potential for overall health and anti-aging. However, as an unproven product, the well-marketed pills could also be a waste of money. Here are some pro and cons of the product so you can make a decision on whether or not to purchase Basis for yourself.

Pros

  • Potentially effective in improving cell functions and promoting overall health
  • Can aid in anti-aging efforts
  • Extended the lifespan of non-humans such as worms and mice
  • Some users claim the pills gave them extra energy
  • Purportedly backed by “rigorous science”
  • FDA approved
  • Tested for purity by a third party
  • Renowned scientists “advise” the company
  • The company founder is an expert on aging
  • Vegan, natural, gluten and nut free

Cons

  • Vague claims that can be difficult to prove
  • No longitudinal research on safety and benefits
  • Expensive
  • No differentiating factor from other NR supplements
  • The big-name scientists are not the ones actually doing the product research
  • Clever marketing can lead consumers to believe the supplement is more than it is
  • Sketchy business practices that resulted in a lawsuit
  • Not available in big box stores or retailers outside of Elysium
  • Benefits not proven in humans

Where to Buy Elysium

Currently, the only place to purchase Basis is directly from the Elysium website. The company offers monthly delivery plans so customers automatically receive a bottle of Basis every 30 days. Plans start $40 per month if you prepay for the entire year. A six-month prepaid subscription bumps the price to $45 per bottle. Bottles of Basis cost $50 if paid monthly, or $60 if bought as a one-time purchase. Depending on your plan, Elysium Basis will cost you between $1.33 and $2 each day.

Other supplements using the ChromaDex ingredients can be found online. They are not as aesthetically pleasing as Basis and are not supported by important names in the scientific community. Like the Elysium product, they are not well researched in humans. They are cheaper, though, and may serve as a good alternative to the Basis supplement.

Final Thoughts on Elysium Basis

Elysium Basis may be a fantastic supplement to combat aging and improve overall health at the cellular level. Without human research that proves the possible benefits, however, all Basis can offer is potential. The supplement has many supporters, but it also faces its fair share of critics. Does the product work, and is it worth the money? It seems only time (and more rigorous, long-term research studies) will tell.

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